STL Science Center

STL Science Center

15 July 2018

Short Video

Staurikosaurus is not very well known, in terms of media presence and general availability of quality fact pages on the internet. There are a few notable pages, such as the NHM in London, KidsDinos, and the DinosaurFacts website. These pages are all summarized, for the most part, in the WizScience slide show/video that has been made for Staurikosaurus shown below.

14 July 2018

Brazilian Theropod

Herrerasaurids make up some of the earliest dinosaurs and the earliest theropod dinosaurs as well. These small carnivorous bipeds are known for their agile appearances and small stature as well as their basal characteristics that laid the groundwork for their descendants, even some of the characteristics that can be found in the latest theropods like tyrannosaurids and abelisaurids. These characteristics were modified over time of course, but the changes can be traced back to these small herrerasaurid dinosaurs that have mostly be found in South America from a number of different locations. One of these locations, in Brazil, was the discovery site of an animal known as the "Southern Cross lizard", Staurikosaurus pricei. The specific epithet honors one of Brazil's first paleontologists, Llewellyn Ivor Price, who collected the fossil which was later described by Edwin H. Colbert. Staurikosaurus was Brazil's first discovered and described dinosaur, but has remained a very uncommon find, meaning that either it was not native to an area that allowed for easy fossilization (such as a forest) or was simply uncommon in its environment.

Staurikosaurus was one of the first dinosaurs and that makes its fossilized remains just as important in understanding the rise of dinosaurs as those of Herrerasaurus and other dinosaurs considered to be the first members of the dinosaur clade. Its long slender limbs appear to have been well equipped for running; forelimbs are missing from the fossil record so we do not know if was good at catching its prey. We do know that its jaw was filled with many serrated and recurved (curved toward the back of the skull) teeth, so it could have caught prey with its mouth rather than with hands. These teeth were also able to slice into its prey. As far as predators of the Late Triassic are concerned, Staurikosaurus was likely a fearsome foe for many smaller reptiles and mammals that it lived with.
©Nobu Tamura

12 July 2018

Socketed Teeth

Thecodontosaurus was named for its teeth. Thecodont teeth are situated so that the base is completely enclosed in a bony socket, like our teeth and the teeth of other mammals, crocodilians, and dinosaurs. To help visualize this refer to the image below.
The specific epithet refers to the ancient age of the animal. John Morris, the English geologist who provided the specific epithet in 1843, simply appended the name antiquus to Thecodontosaurus, attributing the name to Henry Riley, the surgeon who helped with the excavation, without any explanation. Therefore we do not know what Morris was referencing with the name T. antiquus. It could be either the fact that it was a fossil animal or that it came from Triassic rock. We may not know any time soon.

Over 245 fragmentary specimens of Thecodontosaurus are known, all attributed to this single species; not for a lack of trying though as 14 other species have been named only to be reassigned to other genera or re-folded into the single valid species. A second species was speculated in 2000 by Benton et al., 2000 when observing more robust specimens of Thecodontosaurus. In the same paper the authors stated that the more robust morphology was equally as likely a result of sexual dimorphism as it was a potential additional species. Regardless of the findings of the paper as regards sexual dimorphism or secondary species, two morphologies are acknowledged simply as gracile and robust.

09 July 2018

A Short Short

Thecodontosaurus is not very famous in terms of on film presence (for many dinosaurs this translates simply into "not very famous" at all). However, the University of Bristol started a program in 2000 to engage and educate the public using the research and expertise of university faculty in conjunction with local (and global) fossils and the research that has gone into them. Thecodontosaurus is a dinosaur that was featured heavily in the Bristol Dinosaur Project because it was a very local (read found near, around, and in Bristol) dinosaur that made for an engaging animal in the initial stages of the growth of the Bristol Dinosaur Project; the project originally centered around the recovery and preparation of Thecodontosaurus specimens in addition to the outreach components conducted by the faculty. In fact, the mission statement is still mostly concerned with laboratory work on Thecodontosaurus specimens, but the outreach component appears to continue to be a very valuable portion of the work. The website is a little outdated and other news sources only cover up to the funding cycle for 2013, though the Bristol Zoo (which partnered with the university for some time) last mentions their dinosaur exhibit during the summer of 2017, so there is hope. Anyone that knows more about the project's current state is encouraged to share more with us, but we can only hope that a wide-reaching scientific and educational project like this is still in effect.

08 July 2018

A Learning Video

WizScience with a summary video of facts for you to learn some more general information about Thecodontosaurus on this wonderful Sunday:
Additionally, there are a number of pages that have fact files, many different visual interpretations, and a fair bit of discussion about the dinosaur and what we know about it.

07 July 2018

Thecodontosaurs

An early socket-toothed sauropod, Thecodontosaurus antiquus Morris, 1843, was discovered in Southern England from Late Triassic (227-205 million years ago) soils around 1834. As many of these stories go, the people that found the remains were academics that could have been called doctors, naturalists, or scientists, depending on the definition they decided to use. A surgeon, Henry Riley, and the curator of the Bristol Institution for the Advancement of Science, Literature, and the Arts, Samuel Stutchbury conducted an expedition in a Bristol quarry where "saurian remains" were reported. Most of a skull was recovered, leading to descriptions of the teeth and name of the animal: Thecodontosaurus meaning "socket-toothed lizard", referencing the way in which the teeth were socketed in the jaws. 

Other fragments of the fossils represented various portions of the entire skeleton including the neck and "body" (ribcage and vertebrae), forelimbs, and legs led the initial description to identify Thecodontosaurus as a dinosaur; the fifth known and named dinosaur in fact. This diagnosis has not changed (some dinosaurs and non-dinosaurs identified in the earliest days of paleontology have been rediagnosed any number of times in the past 200 years) and has actually been supported by more material being recovered and identified. This is a good thing for many reasons, including that the holotype was destroyed in a 1940 bombing raid of Bristol by the German Luftwaffe.


05 July 2018

Fame and the Dinosaur

Tawa hallae is a famous early theropod not only because of its coverage by the National Science Foundation or the publication of its description in Science. Tawa is also famous because it was an early theropod situated between the earliest theropod dinosaurs we know, animals like Herrerasaurus and Eoraptor, and the previously considered base of the theropod tree: Coelophysis and its family members. In a way that makes Tawa a kind of "missing link" (a term that scientists do not generally actually like using because it has been so warped). Tawa may be a link between those South American theropods and the rest of the theropod family, but that does not mean it is the only link nor that it is the most important link. The fame that its current status has given it, though, has been immortalized in books, television, online videos, and it has even become a model and toy that is loved by many children (and adults); there is even a new model for this year.